Sanctuary Birthing Weekly Birth Chat with Jae and Rhione

This week we interview Adriana Lozada from Birthful Podcast about the benefits of physiological birth!

Posted by Jae Rowan on Friday, May 22, 2020

SPEAKERS
Rhione Zeixchel, Adriana Lozada, Jae Rowan

Jae
This is Jae and Rhione with sanctuary birth chat and we are so excited to have Adriana with us today. She’s an advanced doula. She’s a postpartum educator, a child sleep consultant and the amazing host of the Birthful podcast of which Rhione and I have been followers for some years. So thank you so much for joining us here today Adriana, we’re excited to speak with you.

Adriana
My pleasure. Thank you for inviting me. I’m so excited. I love talking about this about all the things birth physiology that we’re going to be talking about today. And this is so much fun.

Rhione
We’ve listened to Birthful for years, I definitely share the link, I send it to everyone in my classes. There’s always something on there that’s relevant to the pregnant people we’re helping. So it’s a really great work, some really great work that you’re doing and I have nothing but gratitude to you for that. Thank you.

Adriana
Thank you. I am happy to be a bit of a, you know, vessel to amplify birth stories and the amazing work that other professionals do as well and just to showcase because birth people are really passionate individuals, right? We really enjoy what we do. So that’s good work.

Rhione
We can help ourselves. it feeds the soul. So I always say. Well, we were going to talk about birth physiology, and this word, the whole word physiology, physiological birth. Has risen to the top more and more now. When we talk about birth, and I hear it on your, your podcast and I hear it coming from you and will you explain what you know, what is birth physiology? What are you meaning and how does it work?

Adriana
Yeah, so I think birth physiology helps give a framework and an understanding of how the process works because we know that birth is not pathological right? It’s a process that your body does, you know how to birth, but I think with our Western culture, ideas of organization and you know, checklists and having prototypes and just everything in its place, and definitions and evidence based medicine, all of these things, which are great, but When you then say, you know, trust your intuition, birth is a process that flows, people have a little bit of a difficult time grasping what that means. And I, myself did as well. And I find that physiology really brings it back to basics, and also builds an immense trust in the body. That’s why I really like physiology, you know, like, why does physiology work? It gets kind of like biology, but it takes it a step further, because a physiological process is one that you do without thinking. Yes.

Rhione
Yes.

Jae
It’s hormone driven. It’s driven by the hormones and the chemicals that our body releases and there’s so many intricate processes that affect it. It’s hard for people to understand.

Adriana
Yes, super intricate processes. How hormones work, but also like how things, it’s not just the hormones, because the nuts and a little bit of how physiology works is that, yes, it happens without you thinking about it, but we can interfere with it. And I think, where the distinction that’s really important, and why you can’t just go like, oh, physiology is just gonna work. But you have to consciously figure out how to support it and once I understood that I got really passionate, because I find that when my doula clients understand that and even podcast listeners understand that things click, and they change how they approach birth and how they show up for it, which is everything.

Jae
Yeah, so can you share with us some of what you’ve learned about how physiology works?

Adriana
Yeah. So um, how I structured it in talking to all these different birth professionals over five years with the podcast is creating a birth model that defines that physiology and divides it into aspects of how people can support their physiology. Because I find that, you know, we’re used to describing birth from the outside in. And from a medical perspective, if you ask anybody, how in the birth world, traditional childbirth classes, even care providers, whether they’re OB’s or midwives, or doulas, if you ask how birth flows, help us describe the birth process. It’s divided in three stages with you know, getting to 10 centimeters and then you put the pushing stage and then you have this other stage and you mentioned, you really focus on contractions. All of that is based on a medical point of view that requires observation and It’s just measuring, measuring how far putting it into physically trying to define it into a box that’s easy to grasp quickly, without understanding that every bit is as different as the person giving birth and so it’s important to step out of that and go into physiology with the framework so looking at it from the four aspects of the field Physical, the mental, the emotional, and the chemical the hormonal and how those pieces interconnect, and that it’s not a linear process as we’re used to defining it. It’s not a process that happens every five minutes, you know, a set dilating a centimeter an hour but it’s more like the rest of the physiology that you do how you digest, how every time you go to the bathroom might be a little bit different depending on what you ate, depending on how you slept, and it’s that uniqueness i think is a key part of that physiology. Understand it.

Rhione
That sounds like a midwife point of view, right?

Jae
Well Maybe from the home birth perspective or at least from our perspective. It’s definitely been something that we’ve been working with for many, many years. And it’s deeply embedded in our belief process. I remember the first time I talked to you and you asked me, what do you think is one of the most important things that women need to know if you know the beginning COVID in case they ended up having a birth at home or something and I told you relaxing, relaxing is the number one thing that supports the birth physiology. So I mean that kind of leads us into talking about why. Why is it so important to support Birth physiology?

Adriana
Yeah. Because when you support this birth physiology then it flows. And if birth is flowing, it’s going to go easier. It’s going to be shorter and it’s going to require less interventions and who doesn’t want that? Right. Those are the goals for a wonderful, marvelous birth. I think everybody would agree on that. And so understanding the relationship of intervention and how that disrupts birth physiology is a key point I think that people need to understand so that they aren’t just willy-nilly saying, “oh, we’ll just do that right. Well, this won’t matter.” But understanding that things do matter and why the people who are in the room where you’re giving birth, all of these things are setting up a stage that directly impacts physiology. So these are not decisions to be made lightly.

Rhione
With that sentence you said back at the beginning where “Yes, your body does it without you thinking but you can interfere.” That went like yeah, you can interfere.

Adriana
Right?

Rhione
Because people can say things that get in the way.

Adriana
Yeah. Well and it’s not a thinking brain process. It happens in your mammalian lizard brain and most animals, birth great because they don’t have these neocortex’s that get in the way. And we have a really hard time shutting off that brain. Um, and so and then building that trust for the body like other physiological processes. We know this to be true we blink we breathe, we digest, but we can you know, I can interfere with that physiological process. I can hold my breath. I can travel and then my bowel movements get disrupted. But at some point your body takes over. So the more you help your body do the process, the less you and everybody else around you gets in the way, then that’s key and the trick is how to do it. How to get out of the way when we want to think everything to death and control it and controlling. That need to control is a thinking brain process, it’s an intervention.

Rhione
It’s like music to ears. I’m so excited. I just I love hearing this. “Are you listening people I just really want to hear this.” It’s really, really important advice.

Adriana
Well then but it’s not that we’re just saying oh yeah support physiology because that’s, you know because we feel like there’s a lot of evidence there’s a lot of like there’s a really good reason why we’re saying these things. And why things like turning down the lights, which seems something like something ridiculously simple. How’s that gonna do it? You know what In the hospital, there’s all this great technology to use. Especially made for birth. Why is that? You know, we need to have an IV. You need to you need to have an IV because if things went wrong, we need quick access.The impact that that’s having on the birth but they’re trying to keep you safe. Whereas, but we need bright lights to be able to see like that doesn’t match up. You need the low lights and then you need to be able to choose whether to have that IV or not. And the beauty of that I find is that the way you support physiology is really simple. It’s not complicated, externally focused thing.You don’t need accoutrements and teams of people to to support your physiology, you don’t need the best perinatologist to have a great birth. You need to figure out how to support your physiology, and it’s in you. So I think that’s the other key component of it that I love about, why physiology is important. Because you know, you and your baby the best. It’s an internal concept.

Jae
Yeah. So that kind of leads me to think about, when does this actually start? Right? The interference of the birth physiology. I mean, it doesn’t start in the birthing room, you know, and it kind of leads to that that idea of, “Why as a culture is it so hard for us to support birth physiology?”

Adriana
Yeah, and you’ll laugh because I always say that the first intervention to birth Is the due date. Right?

Rhione
Yeah, absolutely, absolutely! Yeah

Adriana
yeah already start setting up all sorts of expectations and getting that brain thinking into different mind games. So we have a hard time supporting physiology for several reasons. One is that culturally are representations of birth. tend to be really scary and not realistic. You know this idea that we see in the media of your water breaks and you have to immediately run to the hospital. It’s intense and and excruciating and hard. From the beginning and you know you’re out of control. Those things aren’t necessarily so. Birth can be really boring at the beginning. Right. And you should ignore it! So, culturally we think that it’s a very scary thing, and that fear can get in the way because for breath physiology to flow you need oxytocin to flow and oxytocin flows when you feel safe, supported and secure, kind of its nemesis being adrenaline. So if you’re feeling anxious or fearful, you’re not supporting that great physiological flow of oxytocin, which is what you need for strong contractions. So there’s that fear around it. Then the other part of it is we’re trying to to use the wrong skill set for birth. And by that, I mean as a culture, we value results and efficiency and organization and, you know all these very more left brain logical thinking brain skills. None of them are any good, I said none, most of them are no good for birth. The skills you need during birth are ones of being. In the process of being not doing. You know, time is a construct that doesn’t exist. You know, going with a flow and being able to move with circumstances. Yeah, process not goal. So those skills, intuition, right, surrendering. As a culture, we don’t value surrendering. High touch low tech. Trusting your intuition. Who wants to surrender to anything. So The problem is like trust your intuition. What does that even mean and then I put you in a space that is surrounded by machines with people prodding and measuring. And if they’re doing that it’s got to have a value. And so then you’re taken out of the process because you’re checking is the heartbeat all right? Or,you know, what does that does that number, how am I dilated? Who cares, your cervix doesn’t care. So, that goes to my other point that even the birthing person is observing their process. From the outside in. And that is not those aren’t the skills you need. Um, so when you were saying when does the supporting physiology start, it starts from the moment even before you get pregnant because you have to learn the skills that are really going to serve you. If you try to use the other skills, the logical brain thinking skills to birth. It’s gonna let you down, and it’s gonna lead to trauma. It’s going to lead to you feeling deflated, and you know that’s what happened to me because then led me to another path towards all this work that I do now, but I had all the things I checked, I had the midwives Well, we didn’t have the doula because we were stupid. My husband will agree he thought doulas would take his place so, but otherwise I did the childbirth classes. I You know, was hoping for a natural unmedicated birth which I did have But I had it because I was stubborn and I was there, I was surrounded by people in this room and I felt lonely I felt alone I felt miserable. And I lost so much confidence in myself. Because all the things that had worked for me beforehand didn’t. So, back to the [birth physiology] you can’t just go into it willy nilly. You have to learn the process, which makes sense because why would you do anything else in your life without learning the process? You wouldn’t go skydiving without. You could say well it was just falling out of a plane, but you train for that.

Jae
it’s an interesting thing. I was sitting in a room once with a group of childbirth educators for a class and we were introducing our different types of childbirth education. And all of the main childbirth educators in this room, their programs were started by doctors who had grown up on farms, who had witnessed birth, who understood the mammalian aspect of how birth works and how that happens. And I know for me coming into my birth first birth I didn’t grow up on a farm, but my mom did. And all of her siblings were born at home and I heard all about that growing up. And so for me, I had that kind of inner understanding that this was a natural process and I was blessed with that opportunity for myself. So when I think about when does this start, it’s like the myth of childbirth in our culture starts from as soon as we’re old enough to get our very first baby shower, traditional baby shower, you know and I remember going to some early baby showers especially once I started being a midwife student and how shocked I was, all the stories that women wanted to tell each other. Preparing for a baby to be born, it was almost like the worst story was what everybody wanted to hear in it. It’s like we get indoctrinated into this belief that birth is terribly painful that its this horrible experience we need to be rescued. Everyone that we talk to about our birth wants to tell us the only safe thing to do is to do everything they tell you at the hospital and none of that is going to support the physiology that you’re talking about.

Adriana
Right not at all and I think a great like when I describe birth to my clients than they really got because we’re scared right of going into the hospital and not doing what they tell us. And especially if you are you got to know who you are. If you’re a people pleaser, that’s going to be a difficult thing to do to really dig into your mama bear power and saying no, I’m not going to do that. You know, I’m not gonna lie on my back. Because even though every cell in my body saying no, don’t lie on your back, I see people do. And so the stories are so incredible yet? Yeah, like you’re saying it’s really important for the stories to be to be to be switched around and to share positive stories and those are just perfect quote unquote stories you can have a great birth experience regardless of circumstances. So how I describe, I use an iceberg analogy, and talk about like everything that’s out of the water, that’s what we know about birth culturally.That’s the three stages and centimeters and dilation’s and due dates and all the medical stuff, how your care provider speaks relating to birth through a job they have to do that’s all out of the water. And that’s great that you know this language because you’re going to need to converse in it. But it is not your purview. That’s something you do not need to worry about. You pay these people really great money to worry about that. You’re not a medical person and you don’t need to be because it’s not a medical process. What you need to worry about is what’s below the water and below the water. It’s supporting your physiology and I go deeper into you know these four stages of physical, chemical, mental and emotional And what you can do during pregnancy to support each one so you can learn these skills so that then when you get into labor, you also have these new skills to serve you. And when you get to a pivotal point that’s going to derail physiology like a disappointing vaginal check. Because that can spin you right off into thinking brain and take you out of the process and slow you down and then you need pitocin because oxytocin is gone and all this understanding that Whoa, that’s just a snapshot and my cervix hasn’t caught up. What I need to do is go back internally and get some oxytocin flowing. Maybe I’ll walk maybe I’ll move, emotionally what am I feeling? Let’s clear that and then go deep and let them worry about the medical stuff. And I see clients, students like have get checked in there were two in the morning, an office appointment and then they started labor and no you need to come in and they come in and check the gun and they’re to exactly the same, you know, 12-20 hours later they could go into a panic. If they were looking at it from a traditional point of view what we know and culture of like, all this work that I’ve been doing has been for nothing. Nothing is happening. The cervix, the number hasn’t changed, where they go, you know what the cervix hasn’t caught up. Let’s look at all of you instead of just the Just that number, go deep support physiology and they have a baby in 2 hours because It’s not linear.

Jae
It’s not.

Adriana
Yeah, that’s why I think I really like that analogy of the iceberg because they’re also in one fell swoop eliminates the hierarchy. And it’s not antagonistic, right? It’s not us against them. It’s this is what you’re good at it’s this is what I’m good at and we’re working together to take care of all the aspects.

Jae
Right

Rhione
I want to use that example of the power of a cervical check and what you know just the idea that someone is going to measure you. Is gonna measure you and then give you a number. Oh My. And even if someone’s thinking brain said no, I know that It’s just a number. Still when I hear I’m being assessed that there’s no change And I know how hard I’ve been working, you know, that’s a crash, that is like a crash and most of the time, I think vag exams, I’d rather they didn’t exist. You know, I just For most, we of course we use them sometimes. But in terms of, “huh, let me get this information for myself to figure things out.”

Jae
Progress in labor, right?

Adriana
right and then having a stranger, quote unquote right? put their hands in your sacredest of spaces to tell you what’s happening in a process inside your own body, like that’s the only way of knowing like how rude.

Rhione
Yeah, there are women. I mean people who have declined vag exams with a clear knowing that they have history of trauma And they made that clear to their providers, “this is not going to be good for me If you try to check my cervix,” and I have seen those women have incredible births because they were respected the providers were willing to say, “Okay, we’ll just trust that this is going to work because we don’t want to bother you.” And when that happens, who knows what their cervix did but they sure had beautiful labor’s and their babies came out with ease.

Adriana
They felt supported, safe and secure instead of having to, you know meet a certain standard.

Jae
for me, this really brings up that the training and medical and nursing programs around labor and delivery are based on management of this reality is not based on the how can we as medical providers support the physiology of women? And it’s not to say I’m not trying to say blame. I’m not blaming anyone here. I think the problem is with the education, not with the providers. So I think going into this with the idea that you’re planning a hospital birth What you’re teaching and I know what we’re working with people on as well. Understanding how to support your own physiology, understanding how to have boundaries that are healthy, how to learn to say no and to create the opportunities you need for yourself in that environment with the knowledge that the management is there if it’s needed, but most of the time it’s not needed, right.

Adriana
Yeah and how to help them have clear expectations of what the environment you’re going to be stepping into is all about and how it can affect your physiology and what you’re going to do to counter it. Because it’s not about you know, saying no to every vaginal exam and like those things happen, you’re going to encounter that. And you might want the information if it’s something that’s going to be helpful to you. By all means, but as a de facto, that’s when it’s not necessary it can do harm. So, yeah, and nobody goes into a medical field if they didn’t love and wanting to support it. Right, I agree with you and it’s not the person’s heart to what they’re required to do this monolithic structure that and a culture within a cultural surroundings them has determined that birth is in a certain way. So that’s a lot to dismantle. It’s a lot to dismantle. Um, and I think COVID has really helped to take little bit of the blinds off of the that in the sense of there’s this idea that the only safe place to Get first is in the hospital and right now Hospitals We’re perceiving them as not a safe right? And then It’s coming culturally. That’s what we’ve said. You know you birth in hospitals still today what is it 99 percent, a little less than 99% of births in the US happened in hospitals have been Yeah, so that is the culture Believe, I think it’s starting to shake a little bit and it’s a create opportunity for people for people to reconsider and rethink These beliefs that may not resonate anymore. might have been something that we’re just, you know, why do we do it because it’s so way we do it. Well to challenge that a little bit and I’m curious to see how this is all going Continue Because I think people are starting to pay a little more attention. As a doula and I always say I have the luxury of not doing anything medical. So because that’s not my wheelhouse, I can’t go to that wheelhouse. Right? And that puts me in a very lovely space of really having to figure have the support physiology and especially when we go to these other environments, and how to protect that space for my clients. So I think that that shows me I’ve seen it so much that it can work regardless of where you give birth Because I’ve seen fantastic hospital birth You know, flowing smooth, easy hospital births and I’ve seen really difficult home births so it’s not one thing doesn’t guarantee the other right yeah

Jae
I think the key is that personal responsibility, like what you started out with at the very beginning of saying the things that you As in new birthing people out there can do to support your birthing physiology. There’s things you can learn about yourself how you can, you know, all the things that you teach. And I know that we also work with, for people to understand that this is not something you’re turning over to your doctor, to the nurse to the people taking care of you in the hospital. It’s like you’re an individual coming into this birth experience with the opportunity to tune in and deeply do your birth physiology and experience all the incredible benefits, which you named pretty quickly at the beginning, and maybe this would be a good time to kind of elaborate a little more on what are those benefits? Like, why is birth quicker? What makes it more efficient? What’s going on there when we’re really tuned in to her birth physiology that that makes it a different kind of experience?

Adriana
Yeah. Well, and I love like, the more I learned about physiology, the more and all of it and the more I it’s people should really learn about it because there’s so many. It’s the body’s mandate and the baby’s mandate to survive and thrive. So there are so many things put in place to do that reflexes things that happen automatically. So, you know in terms of it, it physiologies helps things flow better because it keeps contractions coming with that flow of hormones and those strong long closer together. contractions are what create change to help this baby come out and you are moving around, helps also get baby in a better position so that they can rotate Under these, if we look at lakes not with the medical doesn’t have value, it has total value. I am so grateful for all of it existing. And we know things like the things that we know about physiology we know Because they’ve been studying medically right of, say the babies. The rotation. What is the word I’m thinking about the cardinal movements of Labor where the baby tucks her chin and engages and, you know, descends and then there’s the internal rotation and extension and restitution of the shoulder. Like all of that is a beautifully engineered process to have a baby go through this tight squeeze of elements. And the fact that they have this reflex on the back of their heads where the pubic bone, when that internal rotation happens and the pubic bone hits the back of the head, they instantaneously reflex extend to navigate that curve between pubis and an pelvic bone. That’s marvelous like it gives me goosebumps when I learned about it. The babies have reflexes on the bottom of their feet. As they unfurrow in the uterus and come out of the uterus and have that extension happens and they’re looking more like a nest instead of the curled up, C that they At the beginning, and then their feet are able to connect with the uterus and as the uterus pushes on them, they push against that to spring forward into life. It’s like, yeah, it’s a marvelous thing.

Jae
It’s incredible. It’s incredible description. That’s beautiful.

Adriana
I mean, it’s a great, great feat of engineering. It’s amazing and it does For everybody, every baby, just like the amazing feats that we do a blinking of digesting of breathing like all of those are also amazing. So, supporting that is how you get a shorter birth that requires less interventions that flows and those were the things that you said I went through really quickly. Right?

Jae
Okay, I mean, I think it was important to very beginning for people to recognize like there’s a reason to listen to us. Now because there’s some great things that you can gain from tuning in Your birth physiology learning about it Enhancing Through that those processes I mean, I think so many people just say, Well, this is a process my body just knows how to do I, my doctors helped with this, however many hundreds thousands of times and I can just trust the process and I can’t tell you how many countless times in my early conversations with birthing people I hear these kinds of things. And, you know, I want to say there’s so much more and I do get that opportunity to help people learn that there’s so much more here for you and I know for us as midwives trained in the home setting You know, we learned for physiology at least I can say for myself deeply in my body by watching it unfold, but creating the situation That allowed women to be individuals birthing people within their own timing. in their own way to learn about how gravity helps from the very beginning, you know, it was a great education. And at the same time, it’s always important to be willing to not as you said, you know, we’re so grateful for it for the medical community, what they do, how they support birth and all that happens there. But to recognize that and taking responsibility is not antagonism taking responsibility is choosing for yourself and your baby what you want, you know, I know I’m studying with Marie Morgan when we took the hypnobirthing training as have a really clear picture in your head of her like, showing this like smile and putting up her hand and you know, having the birthing companion, Doula, whoever saying, Hey, you know, is the baby doing okay, is is the birthing person doing? Okay, well, great. We’re gonna stick with our birth, you know, and allow this process and what isn’t said is allow the process to take its physiologic journey allow this birthing mama baby, this birthing person and baby to let it unfold in the right timing. And then as all the things that you teach this, the four parts, you know, helping people understand that that 10% above the water underneath this, this is 90% of birth physiology that makes all the difference in the birth process. So I’m really grateful that we’ve had this conversation today.

Adriana
And I want to close also saying that saying I’m just gonna, you know, I trust my providers and they know that I’ve seen this tons thousands of times. They have, but they haven’t seen physiology, thousands of right. They, they have seen interventions and management thousands of times, and I have heard from care providers and nurses All these across the gamut. When there’s a physiological birth happens in the hospital it restores their faith in birth. Because they have lost that. They know the theory but they don’t see it in practice, because they don’t understand. Like, I was talking about the cardinal movements of the baby. In the way we in the technocratic way that we the model, the technocratic model health model that we as Western culture, subscribe to right. And Robbie Davis Floyd really explains that beautifully It’s just so, I love it where the body is seen as a machine, and we’ve got to fix the different parts and we focus on the different parts independently, not holistically. So we see it in birth, where, you know, you learn about what the baby’s doing with these Cardinal movements. And you learn about what the uterus is doing in the cervix with the progress, you know of dilating, softening and all that. But they’re not placed together. And when you play some together, you realize getting to 10 is no reason to push. You get to turn the doors open, but that had is still looking towards the hip because the pelvic inlet is wider side to side. So babies go in with their head looking to the side. That’s why you have internal rotation so that they can rotate the head and align on the outlet front to back and it’s that rotation hasn’t happened, even if you got to 10 and opened, right? That’s not time to do that. And then if you start pushing right away, that rotation hasn’t happened. Then you’re jamming a square peg into a round hole, you’re actually getting in the way of the flow, you’re making it harder and you have people that push for four hours and then Yeah, you’re actually in the end it’s that’s just by not understanding by looking at it in such a disjointed way. Right? Um So yes, they are experts but you need to you’re experts in yourself and in your process and in your baby so you need to figure out how to tune in and connect. And how many times have you guys heard you know, I’ve seen nurses come in and go like no, it’s not time yet. Yeah, well, and they’re like really laid back. And then the birthing person turns around goes like, “baby’s coming, go get them”and they’re like no you just got here or whatever and, or the other way around other things and they’re like, something’s up or I think we’re at a home birth. I think we should go something doesn’t feel right. That’s that intuition because They’re in deep under physiology going to deeper brain waves of labor land and connecting with the process. Yeah. And I know that’s like a lot of all of those concepts are things that we could talk about individually for hours, right? Yeah, yeah,

Jae
I think I think that bears repeating though, what you just said, in short, is that we’re saying to all of you out there that you are the expert for yourself and your baby. And the more time you spend during your pregnancy to connect in with yourself and stay tuned in with your baby and you respect yourself that way to recognize nobody knows what’s going on inside you better than you. And that your support team like you said that 10% that medical team you are paying them to watch out for you and that’s their job. And if you can also really own your your truth of being the expert for you listening to yourself listening to baby. So I just wanted to emphasize that because it’s an important part of what you were saying.

Rhione
Yeah. Yeah, that’s a big. That’s the big work to do. I mean, that’s a big work to do. And yeah, it’s so great that we have support people. And we have information more than we’ve ever had before. But the big work is that stuff that’s under the part of the iceberg we can’t see.

Adriana
And it’s the first lesson in parenting. We’re already a parent, like this baby is not outside, but you’re already a parent. So take responsibility of this first enormous process. happen.

Jae
The Mona Barrett analogy that you used earlier, you know, I love to say to people, like if your baby was already on the outside, and there’s something going on, are you gonna like hand that thing back and like your babies running across you, your toddler, whatever, you know, No you’re gonna run out there, you’re gonna grab them, you’re gonna take responsibility, because you see your child on the outside but acknowledging, hey, you’re already a parent, this child is inside you, and you’re already a parent, you know, to understand that it’s a great thing to take that responsibility to, you know, to be that mama, papa bear. Yeah.

Rhione
There is a lot to think about today. This is is a lot. this is beautiful.

Jae
Well, I know that we’ve run over. I’m really glad that we took this time and I’m hoping that you can share with everyone how they can reach you and what offerings you have right now that you’d like to tell people about?

Adriana
Yeah, um, well, you know, listen to the birthful podcast, you’re gonna learn a lot more bits and pieces of all this all the time. And you can always send me an email to info@birthful.com. That’s the easiest way And then in terms of offerings, I have at birthfulcourses.com, that’s where my courses live. And I do have postpartum preparation classes because the birth is just the beginning. You know, figuring out how to thrive those first few weeks, not just survive them. And then I also have periodically I think the next one is going to start in July I do tell child birth preparation classes, I call it childbirth education, celebrates preparation. And it walks through all this physiology and breaks it down and into and with, you know, checklists and homeworks of what to do to support get to get, learn those skills, start preparing so that you can use them during birth and what happens when things derail or pivotal moments. And then and then I also do for doulas, I do a full day advance doula workshop on rethinking prenatal speech. Cuz like you said, This work is done. Not at the birth, it’s done ahead of time. So those prenatals are hugely important. And information for that should be up with birthfulcourses.com. But if it’s not, you can always shoot me an email info@birthful.com if you’re interested, and thank you so much for having me today. Yeah.

Rhione
Thank you so much. We’re so grateful. We want to tell them about what decided to do yesterday. What did you decide to do yesterday? Oh, yesterday when we made a decision yesterday that we were starting what we’re calling a virtual midwife program. And it’s an offering and we’re really excited about it. You can go to what is my virtual Midwife Yeah, myvirtualmidwife.com and we make ourselves accessible for anyone who signs up for virtual midwife support, not meaning on call for your birth but meaning helping you prepare in these ways that we’re talking about now

Jae
Day to day. It’s a it’s a boxer support offering so it’s like unlimited boxer support so people can ask their questions, not taking our place of medical care in any way but offering people the opportunity to tune in with us to support the birth physiology and pregnancy and-

Rhione
Not gonna have to wait till their next prenatal or we’re excited about it.

Adriana
But I love that idea and also into the early postpartum and just Yeah, yeah, because that specially also is People usually give birth and then they’re seen in six weeks and a lot happens during those six weeks. So to have somebody you could reach out to,

Rhione
to have a midwife support practices that midwives know, that are really tried and true in terms of getting yourself prepared for your birth. And just what you said yes. For the postpartum time as well.

Adriana
Yeah, and pregnancy too. I love that’s so valuable. I’m glad you guys.

Rhione
I mean, it’s in addition to the courses we’re offering and the coaching, it’s, it’s, hey, this could work for anybody

Adriana
wait and it’s not to replace anything. It’s supplemental. Right. It’s supplemental. Definitely,

Rhione
I think we’ll all admit. We need supplemental right now more than what we have?

Jae
Yeah, I mean, you’re feeling really concerned about something and you want to ask a question sort of like googling, you can box your virtual midwife. Anyway, well, thank you so much for taking the time today. We’re really really grateful and really enjoyed.

Adriana
My pleasure. It was really fun. I love talking to you guys.

Jae
Great. Thanks so much. All right.

Rhione
Bye for now!